Date Published:
Mar 13, 2013
Category:
Discussion Papers
Focus Area(s):
Code:
DP 2013-09

The year 2013 marks the fifth year of the Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps) implementation in the country since its inception in 2008. The first batch of beneficiaries will be graduating from the program in several months` time. Meanwhile, the government continues to expand the implementation devising along the way several variants that it deems necessary to address the many facets of poverty. The 4Ps is by far the largest poverty reduction and social development program the Philippine government has ever conceived. Approximately PHP 120 billion have already been allocated to the program up to 2013.

The program`s dual objectives are social assistance and social development. It provides cash assistance to poor families to alleviate their immediate needs and aims to "break the intergenerational poverty cycle through investments in human capital." As program graduation nears, many questions arise of what to expect from this program. It is rather fitting at this point to draw together assessments that have been conducted so far and to look into some important issues in terms of design and implementation. The paper seeks to answer whether expanding the program would likely yield better results or not. It discusses the outstanding issues most especially those on the aspects that have a bearing on the program`s ability to facilitate inclusive growth.

Citations

This publication has been cited 9 times

In other Publications
  1. Flores, Marc Jon S. et. al. 2019. Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps): Its effect on the academic performance of student-beneficiaries in Calaba National High School in the Philippines. Journal of Public Administration and Governance, 9, no. 2, 193-208. Macrothink Institute.
  2. Kakwani, Nanak and Hyun H. Son. 2015. Social rate of return: A new tool for evaluating social programs. Working Papers 383. ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  3. Mina, Christian D. and Katsushi S. Imai. 2015. Estimation of vulnerability to poverty using a multilevel longitudinal model: Evidence from the Philippines. Discussion Paper Series DP2015-16. Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
  4. Mina, Christian D. and Katsushi S. Imai. 2016. Estimation of vulnerability to poverty using a multilevel longitudinal model: Evidence from the Philippines. Discussion Papers DP 2016-10 (Revised). Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
  5. Mina, Christian D., and Katsushi S. Imai. 2016. Estimation of vulnerability to poverty using a multilevel Longitudinal model: Evidence from the Philippines. Discussion Paper Series DP 2016-16. Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
  6. Minam Christian D. and Katsushi S. Imai. 2017. Estimation of vulnerability to poverty using a multilevel longitudinal model: Evidence from the Philippines. Journal of Development Studies, 53, no. 12, 2118-2144. Taylor & Francis Journals.
  7. Quimbo, Stella Luz A. et. al. 2015. Where does the money go? Assessing the expenditure and income effects of the Philippines' Conditional Cash Transfer Program. UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 201502. University of the Philippines School of Economics.
  8. Tutore, Melba V.. 2014. The impact of the Philippines conditional cash transfer program on consumption. Philippine Review of Economics, 51, no. 1, 117-161. University of the Philippines School of Economics and Philippine Economic Society.
  9. Yap, Josef T.. 2014. ASEAN Community 2015: Managing integration for better jobs and shared prosperity in the Philippines. ILO Working Papers 994869993402676. International Labour Organization.


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